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The 99% Episode #9 With The Hate Club

Embedded in the alternative electronic genre, singer The Hate Club packs a musically visceral punch. The LA-based artist who is originally from Ukraine has allowed music to be a big part of him. It reflects strongly since he studied many styles of jazz until his found his fit and sound. His style embraces confrontation and emotionality to fiend off inner doubt and turmoil. While his tracks can be considered raw, fast-paced, and even explosive, much of his music picks at heartbreak and devastation. He’s also stated, “THC’s final destination is self-expression on the ruins of former self.” Through his fusion of electronic grunge, industrial pop, and punk, The Hate Club is charging forward in the alt-electronic scene.

Listen to The Hate Club’s 99 Percent Podcast Interview Below:

[00:00] Steereo:

Hey everyone, this is Keith Cullen, and you are now tuned into another episode of the 99% Podcast. You’re here with Alex from The Hate Club. Let’s get straight into the questions. Where are you from? Tell us a little bit about your background and how that inspired you creatively.

The Hate Club:

I’m originally from Ukraine, Eastern Europe. I moved to the United States, specifically to the west coast to L.A., around seven years ago. As far as creative background, I’ve been playing music since I was about seven. The main thing that inspired The Hate Club was the identity crisis because of all the possibilities that the modern world offers you in terms of being an artist. I always felt pressure and affected by what people wanted me to do rather than what I wanted to do. It might not have been what the masses were doing or what the trend was. That’s how I arrived at The Hate Club. After being a classical musician, jazz musician, a DJ, almost getting into SoundCloud rap, I realized I have to be doing what I actually enjoy.

Steereo:

When you talk about all those different genres of music, was The Hate Club an intentional statement?

The Hate Club:

We had a problem trying to find a name that I could resonate with. Everything sounded kind of corny whenever I came up with an idea. One day my friend and I were sitting in L.A., and we were both going through obstacles in our lives, so we both went on Facebook to watch cat videos, and we were screaming about how much we hated it and started making fun of everything on social media. We joked about us having a hate club, and so the same night I went home, and I went online to see if there was anything already called The Hate Club. I’m not hateful, but I like to do things in a way that makes you question life. The Hate Club is a playful way to express what you are truly, and this would be a good, grotesque way to do that because I don’t like to take myself seriously or listen to society about what I should be. First of all, it’s fun for me but also, bitter and grotesque.

[06:55] Steereo:

Do you want people to know this name came out of playfulness? Or that it came from real life frustration?

The Hate Club:

I was going through some rough times, I was dumped, and I was devastated. I was really angry and putting it into lyrics helped me. They’re never about anything radical, but it’s about actually moving on and finding the strength to fight it and still come out on top, rather than doing something through desperation. I look at it through the concept of having to burn down to ashes to be reborn. That moment of personal devastation would help me become a new person. At first, I wanted The Hate Club to be the breakup music to help people get over other people and to move on.

Steereo:
You’re obviously on Steereo right now, and you’re an independent artist. From your point of view, what are the benefits bring an independent artist in today’s society and the drawbacks?

The Hate Club:

Benefits are that you retain the full one hundred percent control of your own art. That includes intellectual property and finances because you do get one hundred percent of the royalties and one hundred percent of the income as an artist. You also make all those executive decisions about your own career. I think the benefit is really the freedom. The drawback is that you have to do everything that a label would be doing. It’s hard to manage everything. You need to release music, you need to create merch, you need to go on tour, you need to make a music video, and then you need to promote that. You need to know how to do that. That’s when you learn that certain things need to get prioritized as a DIY artist. You need to take every chance and opportunity out there because you never know what’s going to be the thing that launches your career.

Steereo:

What are your thoughts on music technology and how it’s given artists the opportunity to be discovered? How do you feel about music technology right now?

The Hate Club:

One aspect of The Hate Club is the performance shows and what technology means for this project performance wise and making the vision behind The Hate Club, live. What works the best for me is what makes people react and feel. It’s not about you. It’s about the emotions people go through while experiencing the work you put in. There are all the tools out there that you can use to like get your band or act rolling. You don’t need to know a programmer or a computer a coder to create a website or merchandise. The tools are out there, so you can do anything right now. One thing that I think is crucially here is building genuine relationships with people. If you’re serious about your career, you have to think about it as a long-term strategy. It’s a mix of things, but technology lets you make it happen. Steereo was one of the platforms I wanted to try, and I saw you’re doing SXSW, and I thought that was cool. Especially because so many people take Ubers and Lyfts.

Steereo:
Down the line, how would you like The Hate Club to be remembered? The project specifically.

The Hate Club:

It fulfills several niches. One being emotional and being about accepting your identity and who you are. The first catalog of music was known for helping people to find strength moving on. The other way The Hate Club is going to be remembered and what I’m working on right now is the performance aspect. Coming from the band background and doing classical and jazz, I really loved live performance. I also fell in love with electronic music, so I was DJing, and I love what electronic music offers in terms of new sounds. The Hate Club is really bridging the two worlds of live music and electronic music. My problem with DJing is that it’s not fulfilling to perform because you essentially just press buttons. I can’t pretend I enjoy it because it’s incredibly simple, yet I wanted to use the sound that electronic music has to offer. That’s what I want The Hate Club to be remembered for; I want The Hate Club to be known for bridging the gap between the analog world, live musicians with electronic. I have the freedom to use electronic sounds but also have a band present on stage. That’s where I think we’re gong. As I go, I will keep exploring different subjects for my music, and whatever I’m experiencing in my life.

Watch The Official Video for “One Mile Away” by The Hate Club

Steereo:
I’m genuinely very excited to come out and see one of your shows. I’m so glad you were able to join us today and share your story. Can you give our listeners some information on where to find you and what you have coming up?

The Hate Club:

Right now I have my second E.P. coming out this Friday, June 15th, and you can find me on social pretty much everything @TheHateClub, and I have my music on Spotify, iTunes, anywhere else. As far as shows, I’m doing some light touring this summer. I’ll be playing a few shows in the midwest and on the east coast. One in Detroit and another in Portland, Maine. Then Fresno, then Seattle, so I’ll be all over the place. I tell the story of what I’m doing most compellingly on Instagram, and I’m @IamHateClub.

Steereo:

Thank you so much for taking the time today. Best of luck with your E.P. release on Friday! We look forward to joining you for one of your shows!

The Hate Club:

Thanks a lot! I look forward to one of your shows!

Steereo:

That’s a wrap on today’s interview. Thank you so much for joining the 99% Podcast.

Listen to “Misfit” by The Hate Club

FOLLOW STEEREOWEBSITE // FACEBOOK // INSTAGRAM // TWITTER

FOLLOW THE HATE CLUB: WEBSITE // FACEBOOK // INSTAGRAM // TWITTER

LISTEN THE HATE CLUB: SOUNDCLOUD // SPOTIFY // YOUTUBE

Kai McDaniel is a Los Angeles-based writer, lover of entertainment, art, and film.